Is your home PC or office network safe? When attacked, flawed security can lead to network slowdowns, ‘high jacking’ of computing resources, system failures, and data loss or theft. This can cost unthinkable amounts in lost productivity, recovery efforts and collateral damage.

Are your network and IT assets really secure? How do you really know? Sooner or later you will be tested.

With a San Diego PC Help security assessment you can really know how your network will respond to:

  • external attacks
  • internal malicious threats
  • honest insider mistakes

San Diego PC Help uses a proven multi-level approach to evaluating your home PC or office systems. Using sophisticated ‘intrusion tests’ and configuration analysis, we will review all network components for strengths, weaknesses and fatal flaws.

With a San Diego PC Help security assessment you can finally have peace-of-mind against this growing electronic threat. Our unique four-step process helps identify your internal and external threats.

Once your vulnerabilities have been identified, we’ll help you eliminate these risks. Contact us to find out how we can help you protect your systems through Security Assessments and Security Policies.

Fun facts

In the history of cryptography, the Enigma machine was a portable cipher machine used to encrypt and decrypt secret messages. More precisely, Enigma was a family of related electro-mechanical rotor machines – there are a variety of different models.The Enigma was used commercially from the early 1920s on, and was also adopted by military and governmental services of a number of nations – most famously, by Nazi Germany before and during World War II. The German military model, the Wehrmacht Enigma, is the version most commonly discussed. Allied codebreakers were, in many cases, able to decrypt messages protected by the machine (see cryptanalysis of the Enigma). The intelligence gained through this source – codenamed ULTRA – was a significant aid to the Allied war effort. Some historians have suggested that the end of the European war was hastened by up to a year or more because of the decryption of German ciphers.

Tips & tricks

  • Use strong passwords. Choose passwords that are difficult or impossible to guess. Give different passwords to all accounts.
  • Make regular backups of critical data. Backups must be made at least once each day. Larger organizations should perform a full backup weekly and incremental backups every day. At least once a month the backup media should be verified.
  • Use virus protection software. That means three things: having it on your computer in the first place, checking daily for new virus signature updates, and then actually scanning all the files on your computer periodically.
  • Use a firewall as a gatekeeper between your computer and the Internet. Firewalls are usually software products. They are essential for those who keep their computers online through the popular DSL and cable modem connections but they are also valuable for those who still dial in.
  • Do not keep computers online when not in use. Either shut them off or physically disconnect them from Internet connection.
  • Do not open e-mail attachments from strangers, regardless of how enticing the Subject Line or attachment may be. Be suspicious of any unexpected e-mail attachment from someone you do know because it may have been sent without that person’s knowledge from an infected machine.
  • Regularly download security patches from your software vendors.

Related Links:

Microsoft Technet Security
Security News Portal
IRC Security: